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“A New Song…” To Teach

“A New Song…” To Teach

What are some new ways we can express our love for God?

Teach Me Lord To Wait was written in 1953 and expresses some of the rich truths revealed in Isaiah 40. “Those who wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength. They shall mount up with wings like eagles. They shall run and not be weary; They shall walk and not faint. Teach me, Lord, teach me Lord, to wait.” For those who wait on the Lord, they shall be delivered.

Looking For A City written in 1943 borrows language from Hebrews 11:10. “O yes, we’re looking for a city, Where we’ll never die, There the sainted millions, Never say goodbye, There we’ll meet our Savior, And the saved ones too, Come, O Lord, my Savior All our hopes renew.” How rich and true? How desperately are we looking? This song ought to stir the soldier to look for home.

Master The Tempest is Raging written in 1874 pulls imagery from the calming of the sea (Mt. 8, Mk. 4, Lk. 8). A dynamic song as it changes in volume and tone, from fear to faith. How powerfully it reflects the same raw emotions we all struggle with from time to time. “The winds and the waves shall obey Thy will, Peace be still! Whether the wrath of the storm tossed sea, Or demons or men, or whatever it be, No waters can swallow the ship where lies The Master of ocean, and earth and skies; They all shall sweetly obey Thy will, Peace be still! Peace, be still! They all shall sweetly obey Thy will, Peace, peace, be still!” Peace, the quality all disciples strive to find.

Just As I Am — I Come Broken is a blending of both old and new. The original piece was written in 1834, the chorus song added to it in the last decade and a half. It takes the strength of the old message and combines it with the powerful music writing of modern hymns. “I come broken to be mended. I come wounded to be healed. I come desp’rate to be rescued, I come empty to be filled. I come guilty to be pardoned by the blood of Christ, the Lamb, And I’m welcome with open arms praise God, just as I am.” Come just as you are and be mended, healed, rescued, filled, pardoned — all by Christ. Praise God indeed.

A Shield About Me written in 1991, is almost a word-for-word quote of Psalm 3. A Psalm of David as he is running from his son Absalom. A simple song no doubt, but when properly, and contextually understood this is a profound proclamation. The same few words repeated to reinforce the truth. “Thou, O Lord, art a shield about me. You’re my glory; You’re the lifter of my head. Thou, O Lord, art a shield about me. You’re my glory; You’re the lifter of my head. Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, You’re the lifter of my head.” Hallelujah means “God be praised.” How much better can we state it!?

The song and the song service should be teaching. What is the message we are teaching in our songs?

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    12/4/22 09:00am
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